Public Outreach

Without public acceptance of a particular risk, there can be no effective way to prepare for that risk.   Science shows us that the central U.S. has a real earthquake risk.  Under the direction of CUSEC Board of Directors, CUSEC works closely with many different partners at the Federal Government  and within our Member States to increase awareness of the earthquake risk in the region.  Public Outreach and Education continues to be the primary tool to achieve our mission.   Some of the CUSEC programs related to public outreach and education include - 

  - Working with local, state, regional, and national agencies to develop earthquake awareness campaigns

  - Developing and maintaining an informative and easy to use website

  - Giving presentations on earthquake information, safety, & mitigation to various schools, clubs, etc. throughout the region

Use the links below to learn more about the current Public Outreach & Education initiatives that CUSEC is involved with...



The Great Central U.S. ShakeOut Print E-mail

In April of 2011, more than 3 million people in communities throughout the CUSEC Member States (Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee) and Associate States of Georgia, Oklahoma, and South Carolina, took part in the first annual Great Central U.S. ShakeOut.  The ShakeOut is a multi-state earthquake drill where participants simultaneously practice the recommended action to take during an earthquake.  This historic effort was recognized by FEMA as a recipient of the Individual and Community Preparedness Award for "Outstanding Drill, Exercise, or Event" in January 2012.  It was also recognized by the White House as part of President Obama's "Champions of Change" initiative, and featured in a blog post "Disaster Preparedness is a Partnership Effort" and panel discussion on the whitehouse.gov website.  

In 2012, the Shakeout was held on February 7 across nine states (CUSEC Member States and Associate State Oklahoma) and involved more than 2.4 million participants.  This date marked the 200th anniversary of the last of the great 1811-12 New Madrid earthquakes.   Going forward, the ShakeOut will take place annually on the first Thursday in February at 10:15AM CST.   

The ShakeOut offers a way for the general public to get prepared and take actions before the next damaging earthquake strikes.  It is promoted through a central website, where people are encouraged to register and pledge their participation to take part in the drill.  Participants are asked to use resources on the website such as drill manuals, broadcasts, scenarios, and safety information to help develop their plans for being more prepared against earthquakes.  The ShakeOut is coordinated by CUSEC and our Member and Associate States, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the U.S. Geological Survey and dozens of other partners throughout the country. 

Click here to learn more...
 
Disaster Donations - Get the facts before you donate! Print E-mail

Introduction
The sad fact is, disasters are inevitable. Somewhere, in some capacity, there is going to be a disaster that requires a community to reach out for assistance. How that assistance arrives and is provided to the victims, is a constant challenge.

As Americans, we are some of the most generous people in the world. We want to help communities and citizens recover after a disaster. Unfortunately, unsolicited donations or spontaneous volunteers arriving on scene, may inadvertently make the situation worse by creating a “disaster within a disaster.”

This article is designed to answer basic questions on disaster donations and the steps that can be taken to ensure donations are meaningful to the victims and not an added burden on the relief operations.

Read more about Disaster Related Donations...
 
CUSEC Geocache Print E-mail

Bringing Public Awareness to Another Level

With the world becoming ever increasingly hi-tech, CUSEC has continued to look for ways to promote earthquake mitigation and earthquake awareness in our Member States.  A recent phenomenon, known as Geocaching, has provided us with a new avenue to get this information to a different audience.

Learn more about GeoCaching...